CROWNING MOMENT: Brisbane Bronco Ali Brigginshaw lifts the NRLW trophy after defeating the Dragons in the 2019 grand final to take the title for a second consecutive season. Picture: AAP Image/Dan Himbrechts
CROWNING MOMENT: Brisbane Bronco Ali Brigginshaw lifts the NRLW trophy after defeating the Dragons in the 2019 grand final to take the title for a second consecutive season. Picture: AAP Image/Dan Himbrechts

Women hit hard

Some of the men are having problems motivating themselves to train because they are on their own," Brisbane Broncos captain Ali Brigginshaw said feeling little sympathy for her coddled male counterparts.

"That is a day in the life of every female athlete.

"If they can't get motivated when they are still getting paid more than we ever would then there is something wrong.

"I don't think it is too hard to go for a run by yourself."

The women's game has made great strides in recent years, with the formation of the NRLW and State of Origin series, and creation of the new QRL competition this season.

Brigginshaw fears those gains may be lost due to coronavirus, however, and she thinks the men should stop whinging and remember why they started to play as kids.

"They are sacrificing money but we most likely will not even have a competition," she said.

"They are losing money whereas we're losing our competition and money.

"The women's game had taken so many steps forward and we were going so well.

"This could be a huge step backwards.

"Unfortunately, it's always the women that are the first to get cut out of any sport's talking points.

"That's disappointing."

At this stage the NRL has not decided whether it will cancel the NRLW and women's State of Origin series.

Brigginshaw said the NRL had been communicating via teleconference with all of the players and endeavouring to keep them informed as the situation developed.

"I just want to play a game of footy this year," she said.

"That would be good.

"They will need to let us know soon because we will need to start training as a team.

"It's been a long time that we've been off now.

"But apparently we haven't been forgotten and the NRL is still thinking of us."

Last week NRL CEO Todd Greenberg stood down after it had become clear that ARLC Chairman Peter V'landys was in charge.

With his contract to expire at the end of the year and Greenberg tipped to be replaced after four scandal-plagued years in the role characterised by economic mismanagement, he walked early.

Since Greenberg's exit, many have jumped to his defence, saying he was merely a scapegoat for the problems the game faced.

Brigginshaw joined the chorus of Greenberg backers.

She said some within the women's playing ranks thought the state of the game would improve with Greenberg out of the picture but others were not so sure.

"Who knows what is going to happen now he's gone," she said.

"Some people think it might be better. They are saying Todd was the problem.

"I think it's a step backwards.

"I don't think it is going to work in anyone's favour to be honest."