CLEAR: Mika, 8, Leviticus, 7, and Isaiah Carlton-Telea 11 have a splash in the cool waters of Orion Lagoon, Springfield.
CLEAR: Mika, 8, Leviticus, 7, and Isaiah Carlton-Telea 11 have a splash in the cool waters of Orion Lagoon, Springfield. Cordell Richardson

What the weekend's rain means for Ipswich's fire threat

A SOAKING few days across Ipswich have not been enough to put the minds of the region's firefighters at ease.

According to the Bureau of Meteorology, 5.6mm of rain fell at the weekend, the majority on Sunday morning.

A month's worth of rain is predicted today and tomorrow across most of southeast Queensland and New South Wales.

While it is expected to be enough to soak the ground, Ipswich firefighters say a significant fire threat remains.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Service Acting Area Commander Inspector Des Sardie said recent light rainfall had done nothing to ease the threat.

A grass fire at Rosewood yesterday resulted in 30 fire crews swinging into action.

It is believed the fire was sparked by a piece of farm machinery - showing just how easily a fire can start and get out of control in the current environment.

"We are still in a high to very high fire danger period and there has really been no significant change in Ipswich and surrounding areas over the past few weeks," Mr Sardie said.

"We are still seeing some significant fires that are burning quickly.

"The little bit of rain we've had hasn't done anything. We need inches of rain."

Mr Sardie said the majority of people seemed to have heeded the call from firefighters to delay outdoor jobs with the potential to spark a fire.

With up to 50mm of rain possible over the next few days, Mr Sardie said firefighters could get short respite, but it was not likely to last long.

The southeast's dam levels remain at 75.9 per cent.

Seqwater, the company managing southeast Queensland's drinking water, have a drought strategy if typical rain falls elude the region this wet season.

Mandatory regionwide water restrictions will be implemented when the grid's combined dam levels reach 50 per cent capacity.

If mandatory water restrictions are introduced at 50 per cent capacity, they will be in place across the entire southeast region.

Residents will be asked to use no more than 140 litres of water a person each day.