WELL DONE: Mr Forrest has a benefactor's heart and puts his money where his mouth is.
WELL DONE: Mr Forrest has a benefactor's heart and puts his money where his mouth is. RICHARD WAINWRIGHT

Twiggy puts money where mouth is

WITH more people of influence and conscience like philanthropist Andrew "Twiggy" Forrest standing up to institutions like the world-wide tobacco industry's unconscionable exploitation of tobacco addictions, our federal health bill would be reduced. Addiction to legalised drugs, including tobacco, alcohol and prescription drugs, is creating an under-class in our society.

Mr Forrest has a benefactor's heart and puts his money where his mouth is.

His millions in profit are invested in the lives, not only of Indigenous communities, but the disadvantaged and under-privileged, unlike Clive Palmer and family.

He is one of Australia's richest business men, whose philosophy is: "To whom much is given, much is required."

He is changing lives because he feels investing in people is more productive and will build a better Australia than investing for personal gain and profit alone.

For those addicts who can least afford these price hikes for tobacco products, there are few options but to spend their incomes on their addictions and cravings. It leads to theft and crime, in order to maintain their expensive habits.

One obvious sideline for drug addicts is to break and enter homes and businesses, stealing not only cash, but tobacco products. The illegal importation of tobacco leaf is a major and disturbing crime at the border, feeding an insatiable demand for cheap tobacco.

How one man can stop a centuries-old habit is anyone's guess. But we have to congratulate the man for taking this fight to court, when all else is failing. Raising the price only adds to poverty and crime statistics. The gap between rich and poor is widening. Addictions do not discriminate.

E. ROWE

Marcoola