Chris and Charles du Plessis of Geosim Technologies inside its AW139 simulator.
Chris and Charles du Plessis of Geosim Technologies inside its AW139 simulator. Hayden Johnson

Turkmenistan company turns to Ipswich for new product

AN IPSWICH aircraft simulator company has just shipped off its latest built-to-order product to Turkmenistan.

GeoSim Technologies at Turley St in Raceview took seven months to develop its latest simulator, a take on the Enstrom 480 multi-purpose light helicopter.

The customer was directed to the Ipswich company via a Swiss company that had previously enlisted GeoSim's services. Managing director Charles du Plessis said although the company was used to developing and manufacturing bespoke aviation simulation devices, this one was particularly difficult as the customer based in Turkmenistan had only forwarded a picture of the Helicopter they had ordered and little else.

"It was then left to GeoSim to find the necessary manuals needed to develop its own Sandal and Garmin replica instruments and accurate Qualification Test Guides needed to have the flight model as close to the actual aircraft as possible,” Mr Du Plessis said.

"The simulation device was completed to the customer's satisfaction and once CASA has accredited it under FSD2cat B, the device will be shipped to Turkmenistan for final installation and commissioning.”

A look inside the new GeoSim Enstrom 480 chopper simulator, designed and built in Ipswich.
UP AND AWAY: A look inside the new GeoSim Enstrom 480 chopper simulator, designed and built in Ipswich. (INSET) Chris and Charles du Plessis of Geosim Technologies inside the popular AW139 simulator.

GeoSim Technologies has been in the simulation market since 2002 and has previously worked on a wide variety of fixed wing and chopper simulators for customers across the globe, including the Bell Kiowa, Bell 206, Bell 412 EP and EPI, AS350 B 3, AW139 to the Air Tractor 502 and 802, Cessna Grand Caravan and Piper Warrior.

From a relatively modest shed in Turley St, the Ipswich company's seven full-time and up to four part-time staff tinker away at world-class simulators that are used to train pilots the world over.

Mr du Plessis said he recently had interest shown from places as far away as Russia for the GeoSim devices and jokingly indicated that the vision statement of GeoSim should be changed from "Realism in a simulated environment”, to: "From the deserts of Turkmenistan to the freezing wastelands of Russia there is no place that GeoSim will not go.”

He said the company had considered relocating to a dedicated facility but any move "would have to make financial sense”.