GREAT MEANING: West Moreton Anglican College student Carl Flottmann has been selected to sing at the Australian National Memorial in Villers-Bretonneux, France on Anzac Day.
GREAT MEANING: West Moreton Anglican College student Carl Flottmann has been selected to sing at the Australian National Memorial in Villers-Bretonneux, France on Anzac Day. Cordell Richardson

Ipswich teen's Anzac Day honour at Villers-Bretonneux

CARL Flottmann is gearing up for his most important performance yet.

The 16-year-old will today embark on a month-long tour of Europe that will culminate in a special tribute to the men and woman who have bravely served their country, including his own great-grandfather.

He has been selected to sing at the Australian National Memorial in Villers-Bretonneux, France on Anzac Day as a member of the Voices of Birralee Anzac Commemoration Choir 2019.

The West Moreton Anglican College student has been selected to lay a wreath on behalf of the choir as a part of another performance at the lighting of the flame ceremony at the Arc de Triomphe in Paris.

The tour will see the teenager travel across five countries, visiting memorial sites and doing smaller gigs before the two main events.

His great-grandfather Robert John Peters served in the 1st Light Horse Regiment during World War One.

He was wounded in a battle with Turkish troops on his 19th birthday near the town of Katia after machine gun fire tore the flesh from the inside of both of his thighs.

After being taken prisoner by a Turkish patrol and underwent a more than 480km journey in a stretcher on a camel to Damascus.

Robert spent time in hospital, just about avoiding having to amputate his legs, before he was transferred to a prisoner of war camp and put to work on the Taurus Railway.

He arrived back in Australia in March 1919 to be reunited with his family and future wife Elsie.

Carl, who will take his place in the bass section, has been singing for most of his life and said he was honoured to be selected to perform, believing it to be an experience he would never forget.

"It's going to be in front of thousands of people and I think the Anzac Day performance will be televised as well," he said.

"I'm a bit nervous.

"(Villers-Bretonneux) is a connection that should never be forgotten."