Luis Varney and Cam Villani at Deebing Creek Mission. Picture: Cordell Richardson
Luis Varney and Cam Villani at Deebing Creek Mission. Picture: Cordell Richardson

Traditional owners await ground penetrating radar results

TRADITIONAL owners and campers occupying the land at Deebing Creek spent Christmas preparing and tending to garden beds to grow produce on one of the three sites proposed for future development.

The Yuggera Ugarapul People set up a campsite off Grampian Drive in January this year in a bid to prevent part of the sacred mission site from being developed.

A second campsite was established in October after another developer started preparations to also begin work on the land, which were put on hold after there were calls for further investigations into skeletal remains found in the area.

Developer AVJennings said it still didn’t have a start date for when works would begin on the site.

In the meantime, activist Luis Varney, who is one of many occupying the land, said they would be working to establish a plan for the site.

“Other groups were looking to work with the developers, but the claims to sovereignty does not want to work with the developers,” he said.

“We’re going to improve the quality of this land with farming.

“With all the food we have here, by calling our food sovereignty it makes it an international affair, because this country has not seen indigenous leadership in the food system ever.”

AVJennings recently carried out another ground penetrating radar survey of the area to further investigate claims of indigenous remains.

The survey results were due back this week and will be shared with traditional owners.