CATCH UP: Walking has become the backbone of Cheryl’s social life.
CATCH UP: Walking has become the backbone of Cheryl’s social life.

Somerset walkers hitting the pavement for a yarn

FOR Toogoolawah walker Cheryl Jobling, walking was always on the to-do list but there were never enough hours in the day.

When she and four friends got together to form a walking group, Cheryl found the benefits to be numerous and managed to make time each day to lace up the runners.

“I used to walk most afternoons but I hadn’t done it for a couple of years because time got away,” Cheryl said.

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Coronavirus restrictions meant many other outings were against the law so walking became the backbone of Cheryl’s social life.

“We were told we couldn’t go out anywhere but we were allowed to go out for a walk,” she said.

“We couldn’t play tennis or have our girls’ days so, when we walk, we’re having our get together.”

Cheryl Jobling, John Granzien and Rhonda Jobling. Photo: Ebony Graveur
Cheryl Jobling, John Granzien and Rhonda Jobling. Photo: Ebony Graveur

Now, she walks most evenings and many mornings – not for exercise but for fun.

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“We would get to catch up and say what we wanted to say and walk at the same time,” she said.

“We couldn’t go anywhere else so walking it was.”

She and her friends walk about five kilometres a day and usually spend anywhere between an hour and 1.5 hours hitting the pavement.

While some of her friends use pedometers to track their steps, Cheryl is there for the fresh air and the catch ups.

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“I enjoy walking but walking is not something I do to lose weight,” she said.

“One of us walks in the mornings and afternoons and checks her watch to see her steps and km and all the rest of it.”

She said by walking through town, she was able to not only catch up with her friends but also exchange a wave and yarn with neighbours.

“There are a lot of other people out there walking that never used to be,” she said.

“You see people in their yards and say hello – it keeps you connected with people in town.”

Read more stories by Ebony Graveur.