Aerial view of damage caused during a fire at Bundamba. Picture: Cordell Richardson
Aerial view of damage caused during a fire at Bundamba. Picture: Cordell Richardson

So you think you don’t need a bushfire survival plan?

Bundamba fire destruction from the sky: Aerial view of damage caused during a fire at Bundamba on Saturday which resulted in the loss of a house.
Bundamba fire destruction from the sky: Aerial view of damage caused during a fire at Bundamba on Saturday which resulted in the loss of a house.

WITH recent fire events causing concern in the region, fire crews are pleading with residents to ensure they have a bushfire survival plan ready to go.

Area Director for Rural Fire Service in West Moreton, Inspector Paul Storrs said anyone living within a few kilometres of a bushfire area should have a plan.

"This has been really clear given the example of the fire at Bundamba, where decent fire running through the countryside, but close to a town area, where the people two and three streets away from where the bushfire was going to impact, needed to activate their bushfire survival plan," he said.

"It's about developing a plan for you and your family's future survival in a bushfire event and the best way to do that is to put it in writing."

 

All residents should be prep​​ared for bushfire, but if you answer yes to any of these four questions, you are likely to be at a heightened risk.

- Do you live within a few kilometres of bushland?

- Does your local area have a bushfire history?

- Do you have trees and shrubs within 20 metres of your house?

- Is your home built on a slope?

 

The Rural Fire Service website has a document that can be downloaded to guide you in establishing a plan.

"Families need to consider if they will stay and defend their properties, or if they're going to leave early," Insp Storr said.

"'Where are we going if we leave? Who are we going to tell? What are we taking with us?' these sorts of really key and important questions.

"If they're going to stay, have their emergency kit ready to go anyway. Make sure they've identified the things they want to take with them."

 

 

 

You can create a bushfire survival plan on the Rural Fire Service website.
You can create a bushfire survival plan on the Rural Fire Service website.

Insp Storr said it was important everybody who lives at the house was aware of the family's bushfire survival plan.

"This is something that we see sometimes, when the kids don't know what's going on or Mum and Dad who are staying for the holidays.

"We've got Christmas coming up in a couple of weeks, does everybody over Christmas know where they're going to be and what the fire plan is."

Insp. Storr said it was also important to factor in the health of family members like the elderly or people with asthma.

 

If there is a fire in your area it's important to follow the bushfire warnings. There are three levels of warnings:

 

Bushfire warning levels
Bushfire warning levels

He said it was just as important to prepare your property by keeping the yard mowed, decluttering around the home, cleaning the gutters out and removing anything that could catch embers.

"If you've got water on the property, make sure there's access for fire fighting and make sure you've got plenty of drinking water.

"Those that wish to stay and defend, they need to be aware that if the fire conditions get bad enough, we will tell them to go anyway.

"If that happens, they need to listen to our instructions and leave when we tell them to leave."