A group of residents marched on the council to oppose a development and invited in for a meeting with Ipswich Mayor Andrew Antoniolli and Planning Chair Cr David Morrison.
A group of residents marched on the council to oppose a development and invited in for a meeting with Ipswich Mayor Andrew Antoniolli and Planning Chair Cr David Morrison. Helen Spelitis

Residents still fighting against development

FRIENDS of Bellbird Park are still fighting as developers ready to challenge an Ipswich City Council decision in the Planning and Environment Court.

Judith Vink said case was being reviewed on March 1 and the group would attend.

"It's the first part of an ongoing appeal process.”

CB Developments Pty Ltd had applied to build more than 300 homes on 34ha of Bellbird Park bushland off Eugene St near Woogaro Creek.

But in April Ipswich City Council rejected the development.

Friends of Bellbird Park protested against the development at council chambers and at the time then-mayor Andrew Antoniolli told the group he would call the development before councillors to vote on if planning officers recommended it go ahead.

Days later council officers rejected the application.

Reasons included the development did not conserve essential wildlife corridors, did not minimise risk and had not adequately addressed the risk of landslides or flooding.

Since the application was rejected developers have lodged an appeal.

Now Bellbird Park residents are asking the rest of Ipswich to stand with them to stop the development.

"It's a big development, it will impact surrounding residents in Bellbird Park and Camira,” Ms Vink said.

The residents feel the character of the suburb is being carved up by the ever increasing developments subdividing the area's large acreage blocks.

Ms Vink said the developers had planned on creating blocks under 400sqm in size, while the majority of homes in the area were on acreage.

"We protested, we went to the council chambers in Ipswich we believe that was the turning point for council.

"It's a sloping block, they would have to clear all the trees and conduct major earthworks.”

Ms Vink said retaining walls would have to be constructed some two to three meters in height.

"One person's backyard will be another person's retaining wall and their home.”

Friends of Bellbird Park are also concerned that the proposed development is in the middle of a koala corridor.

Other wildlife that has been spotted on the land is the Green Thighed tree frog, endangered powerful owl, rare short eared mountain possums together with squirrel gliders and over six species of small micro-bats.

"We have a lot of wildlife because of the large blocks.

"People see koalas in their backyard, it's common.”

Deb Mostert, who has lived in the area for 31 years, said the best case scenario was for the council to buy back the bushland and turn it into a reserve.

"It's not conducive to a housing development, it's a gully.”

However if it has to be developed the Friends of Bellbird Park want to see it turned into acreage blocks.