PROGRESS: One month after it was announced recycling would be sent to landfill, Ipswich homeowners had made an effort to improve their recycling.
PROGRESS: One month after it was announced recycling would be sent to landfill, Ipswich homeowners had made an effort to improve their recycling. Contributed

Recycling centre manager sought amid battle against closure

A TENDER to manage Rosewood's recycling and refuse centre has been released by the Ipswich City Council.

According to documents, the council is seeking to engage with experienced suppliers to manage services and used goods recycling for the Rosewood Recycling and Refuse Centre.

Services include managing and maintaining the site, including site presentation and customer service.

The company will ensure domestic waste and recyclable materials brought in by the public are placed in the appropriate waste skips or materials storage areas.

They will also be permitted to salvage agreed items suitable for re-sale or saleable benefit to the supplier.

Division 10 Councillor David Pahlke said the request to tender marked a positive future for the site, which was at risk of closing.

"We've only got two refuse centres in the city, Riverview and Rosewood,” he said.

"There's been some thought about closing Rosewood and for the last five years I've resisted any attempts to close it.

"Whilst it's only one tenth of the population, it's been there for 50 years.”

Cr Pahlke said the cost to dump materials was enforced to keep the council's facility open.

"When people complain about the $12 dump fee I come back and say hey, I'd rather pay that than for it to close,” he said.

"It loses a lot of money being there.

"It's a service for our western corridor and I'll fight to keep it.”

The management of the Rosewood Recycling and Refuse Centre is separate to the Ipswich City Council's kerbside recycling contract.

Last month the council entered into a 12-month contract with Visy Paper to accept recycled waste after it initially announced yellow-bin collection would be scrapped.

The crucial component of the new contract was to drastically reduce contamination down from more than 50 per cent to 15 per cent or less.

No glass is permitted under the council's new contract.

"Broken glass is causing contamination of paper and cardboard that are recycled in the yellow lid bin,” Councillor David Morrison said.

The State Government's planned container deposit scheme is being introduced on November 1, this year, which will enable residents to take selected glass containers to drop-off locations and reverse vending machines for a 10c refund on the container.