Remembrance Day Gatton, 2020. Photo: Ali Kuchel
Remembrance Day Gatton, 2020. Photo: Ali Kuchel

PHOTOS: Prisoners of War honoured at Gatton ceremony

AS A prisoner of war in the hands of the Japanese, Jack Boyd’s selfless personality continued to shine.

According to his family, “Happy Jackie” would sneak out under the fences to steal food for the other prisoners.

His family were at the Remembrance Day Ceremony in Gatton today, where a plaque honouring Prisoners of World War Two was unveiled.

Jack moved to Gatton as an orphan and was unofficially adopted by Daisy and Jack Yates and their six children.

Michelle Yates, the great granddaughter of Daisy and Jack, said their beloved Jackie would have been “over the moon” with today’s service.

“We were fortunately he became part of our lives because he was such a lovely person,” Michelle said.

“He was known for the sayings he had, the way he expressed himself was truly unique and so farm and loving – it made you feel special.”

The family of Private Jack Boyd, who was a World War Two prisoner of War, at the new plaque at the Gatton Cenotaph. Photo: Ali Kuchel
The family of Private Jack Boyd, who was a World War Two prisoner of War, at the new plaque at the Gatton Cenotaph. Photo: Ali Kuchel

Jack, a Private in the 2/26 Battalion, was one of six Lockyer Valley men who were prisoners of war during World War II.

Jack spent a large part of his imprisonment in Japan, working on the wharves and in coal mines.

Upon repatriation, he was honourably discharged on February 17, 1946, and was employed by Southern Electrical Authority.

Michelle said Jack was often remembered as the best “double seller” for his days with the Gatton Hawks, where he also holds a life membership.

Michelle’s brother Brett recalled how Jack would steal food for the other prisoners.

“I don’t know if he was the only one, but we were told how Jackie would sneak out under the fence at night when he was a prisoner of war,” Brett said.

“They would sneak out into town and steal food to feed the rest of the prisoners.”

Brett said Jack always had a smile on his face.