This sign will be erected along the Bremer River and Warrill Creek, warning people not to eat fish caught in either waterway as testing has shown high levels of PFAS chemcials.
This sign will be erected along the Bremer River and Warrill Creek, warning people not to eat fish caught in either waterway as testing has shown high levels of PFAS chemcials.

PFAS warning signs arrive in Ipswich

SIGNS will soon be erected warning people not to eat any fish caught in two Ipswich waterways.

The approved signs were delivered to Ipswich City Council this week and workers will start erecting them along Warrill Creek and the Bremer River in the coming days.

The QT reported on concerns regarding 'inadequate' warnings in June.

Fish caught in both waterways have been found to be contaminated with PFAS chemicals at a level beyond what is considered safe for human consumption.

Last month, Queensland Health issued a warning after being advised of the preliminary lab results by the Defence Department which tested perch, mullet and eel caught in the area.

Between April 9 and 17, Defence undertook preliminary sampling of fish and other marine species from the two waterways.

Investigators tested 21 portions of fish and three prawns. Two whole fish were also tested.

PFAS was detected in all samples with 19 exceeding the safe standards for human consumption.

The council offered to help erect signage to ensure fishers were aware of the contamination.

"Signs were delivered to council this week and we will commence to place them in the investigation area within a couple of days," a council spokesperson said.

"Council has been more than happy to assist and continues to work closely with the Department of Defence and Queensland Health."

Earlier this month, it was revealed the Defence Force relocated potentially contaminated soil from one place on the base to a new location, 40m from the Warrill Creek.

In January 2017, construction crews excavated 16,000 cubic metres of soil at RAAF Amberley Base and moved it south of the runway.

The material was used as flood mitigation for the low-lying area.