HAND 'EM OVER: James Barnett, Ruthie Farrar and Michael Le Messurier of Battery World are encouraging residents to recycle their old batteries.
HAND 'EM OVER: James Barnett, Ruthie Farrar and Michael Le Messurier of Battery World are encouraging residents to recycle their old batteries. Cordell Richardson

New for old deal powers up recyclers

THE HARM that batteries do to the environment after being dumped in landfills will be at the forefront of this year's National Recycling Week.

Australians toss thousands of tonnes of dead batteries into the bin each year without giving it a second thought, but after ending up in landfill, those same batteries leach harmful chemicals.

In an effort to increase public awareness, Battery World Ipswich owner Ruthie Farrar is encouraging residents to bring in their old nine-volts in exchange for a new battery on Saturday, November 17.

Mrs Farrar said Swap It Out Day was a great way to bring the importance of recycling batteries to the public's attention.

"One of our goals is to recycle the same number of batteries that we sell," she said.

"This might come as a surprise to a lot of people, but the average home has about 97 batteries in it, powering everything from your remote controls, to kids' toys and your clocks.

"If you don't recycle those batteries, you are putting toxic chemicals into the ground.

"You should never throw your batteries in the bin."

The recycling incentive is a joint celebration for Battery World, which is also marking the sale of more than one million of its nine-volt smoke alarm batteries. There is a limit of 20 replacement batteries for each customer on the day, however customers can hand in as many old batteries for recycling as they need.