Widow Angela Kelso (right) with her children Eliza, 12, Bradley, 16, and Lyndon (left), 15, remember their father Raymond John Kelso with pride and warmth.
Widow Angela Kelso (right) with her children Eliza, 12, Bradley, 16, and Lyndon (left), 15, remember their father Raymond John Kelso with pride and warmth. Claudia Baxter

Man proud of culture and family

RAYMOND John Kelso was a loving husband and father of three whose life was cut tragically short this week.

The 44-year-old’s family yesterday told of the story of a devoted family man who was proud of himself, his kids and his Indigenous background.

Mr Kelso was pronounced dead at the scene of a horrific car accident at Raceview Thursday morning – the cause of the single-vehicle smash is still being investigated.

Supported by close friends and family yesterday, wife of 17 years Angela Kelso said she still didn’t know what she and children Bradley, 16, Lyndon, 14, and Eliza, 12, would do without Raymond.

“He was a great, loving father who doted on the children. He was involved in every aspect of their lives,” Mrs Kelso said.

“When the boys started playing football at Brothers, Raymond immersed himself in the club – starting out as an assistant coach before moving onto a coaching position – he did that for eight or nine years.”

Mr Kelso was a cancer survivor – he was diagnosed with testicular cancer at the age of 25 – which prevented him from reaching his dream of competing in the Barcelona Olympics in his preferred sport, boxing.

Years later, he would use his boxing skills to help young Ipswich kids, regularly giving them lessons at his Ripley home.

A proud Aboriginal man, Mr Kelso also took the time to teach his children about their culture.

Eldest son Bradley said he was looking forward to learning how to hunt with his dad.

“He would take us to caves around Beaudesert and tell us the stories of the Aboriginal paintings,” Bradley said.

Mr Kelso had been asked to raise the Indigenous flag as part of upcoming NAIDOC Week celebrations in Ipswich – a responsibility he would have taken on with pride.

Her house quickly filling up with flowers and her phone constantly ringing with calls of support from friends and work colleagues, Mrs Kelso said she was thankful to those who had helped her through the most difficult of times.