German backpacker Simone Strobel was found murdered in Lismore in 2005. Photo Contributed
German backpacker Simone Strobel was found murdered in Lismore in 2005. Photo Contributed

Is a palm tree frond the key to cracking the Strobel case?

Could Lismore's longest-running murder case, which has captured the attention of the locals, all hinge on a palm frond?

German backpacker Simone Strobel's murder shook the Northern Rivers when her body was found her body was discovered on a nearby sports ground, hid under torn palm branches at night during a trip on February 11, 2005.

Ms Strobel's body was found hid under torn palm branches and it is those same palm branches which could prove vital in the ongoing investigation into her death.

According to information obtained by German newspaper Mainpost, the list of evidence that would have been presented at the now vacated hearing included, "DNA results from crime scene evidence, including the palm fronds that covered Simone's body."

DNA technology has been a key reason as to why interest in this case has ramped up since August of last year.

When The Northern Star spoke to police in November, advancements in DNA technology were cited as a key driver of the investigation.

""As part of the ongoing inquiries, we are also looking at the advancements in DNA technology and we're constantly reviewing the examination processes of forensic material obtained as a result of this investigation," Detective Acting Inspector Grant Erickson said.

"DNA technology has improved vastly since in the last 15 years since Simone was murdered, that option certainly forms part of our ongoing inquiries with Strike Force Howea."

SEE MORE: Are cop's closing in on Simone's killer?