The countdown is on to Ipswich sport kicks ahead, ending the withdrawal symptoms being isolated. Picture: Cordell Richardson
The countdown is on to Ipswich sport kicks ahead, ending the withdrawal symptoms being isolated. Picture: Cordell Richardson

Hopes grow that Ipswich fields coming back to life

OPINION

THE veggie patch continues to flourish. The yard is looking the best its been in years. And I can even walk in my study without kicking my toe on a stray folder.

Being in isolation has some advantages when you can do extra creating, cleaning and clearing around the house.

However, the one vital ingredient missing is sport, especially the enjoyable winter codes usually played in and around Ipswich.

I'm suffering major withdrawal symptoms from not cheering on Western Pride or the Ipswich Knights in football.

It's also disheartening not lending support to our Ipswich Force basketball teams, especially when a new NBL1 conference was being planned this season.

 

Family friendly hockey is being greatly missed. Picture: Cordell Richardson
Family friendly hockey is being greatly missed. Picture: Cordell Richardson

I was just getting organised to watch more hockey that always has a tremendous welcoming and family spirit about it.

I miss watching the Ipswich Eagles play footy at Mark Marsh Oval and following the Jets and our entertaining Rugby League Ipswich competition sides.

Having the Rangers to keep an eye on and a multitude of other athletic events to cover makes this time of the year traditionally the busiest but most rewarding.

Suddenly, it all stopped.

Saturdays and Sundays aren't the same without local sport to savour.

It's not only the action and usual drama that excites. It's the wonderful people in our Ipswich area that provide countless moments of satisfaction, hearing their stories and chatting about life in our great city.

 

The isolation-created veggie patch continues to grow. Now the hope is Ipswich sport can flourish again. Picture: David Lems
The isolation-created veggie patch continues to grow. Now the hope is Ipswich sport can flourish again. Picture: David Lems

While hopes grow we may have some community sport again soon, the anxious wait continues.

For the first month of isolation, I was coping okay spending more time working remotely at home.

But the past couple of weeks, it has really hit hard.

Waking up Saturday morning having planned a big day of sport to cover is what winter is all about.

Sunday in the office is when the stories come together for our Monday paper and ever-growing QT online service.

Now we are stuck at home and the days are blurring into one another.

Taking long service leave in May for the first time in 35 years is particularly peculiar.

But as I ponder a return to work in a fortnight, the anticipation is building.

Maybe, just maybe, we could soon see the Ipswich and district sporting fields and arenas bounce back to life.

I drove around the Redbank Plains Recreational Reserve the other day, visualising what it would be like with rugby league, Aussie rules, church soccer and other activities filling the fields with fun.

In the meantime, it's back to that veggie patch and tidying up the study.