Ipswich City Council will include the 65 hectares as part of its Mount Grandchester Conservation Estate.
Ipswich City Council will include the 65 hectares as part of its Mount Grandchester Conservation Estate.

Hectares of protected land added to ICC’s portfolio

65 HECTARES at Woolshed, on the city’s outskirts, has been acquired by Ipswich City Council for a six-figure sum as it looks to boost its conservation efforts.

Announced on Tuesday, the new land will soon be added to the Mount Grandchester Conservation Estate west of Ipswich.

The size of the estate will increase by 7 per cent – to 1042ha – as result.

Mayor Teresa Harding said council had been working with the owners for some time, with the acquisition confirmed just this month.

She said the purchase delivered on commitments to protect local environments and heritage.

A boost to local environmental tourism opportunities was also predicted.

Ipswich Mayor Teresa Harding predicts big things to come with recent acquisiton.
Ipswich Mayor Teresa Harding predicts big things to come with recent acquisiton.

“This will increase the capacity for nature-based recreation activities and enhances visitor experience when the estate is activated and developed,” Cr Harding said.

“It also secures and actively restores vegetation containing unique patches of rocky outcrops and habitat areas for significant species, including the vulnerable koala and glossy-black cockatoo.

“It will protect Aboriginal cultural heritage landscape values as well as aesthetic values along the regional significant Little Liverpool Range corridor.”

The sale comes following the recent completion of a five-year project in which 12,500 koala habitat trees were planted.

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12,500 koala habitat trees were planted were planted in the area in recent months. Picture: Kevin Farmer
12,500 koala habitat trees were planted were planted in the area in recent months. Picture: Kevin Farmer

Plans are reportedly under way to increase width of the protected north-south wildlife corridor from 400m to 1000m.

Chair of the Environment and Sustainability Committee Cr Russell Milligan also welcomed the acquisition.

“Larger protected and managed areas are critically important refuges for species, particularly when bearing in mind the cumulative impacts of climate change,” he said.

“This will enhance overall protection and sustainable uses of the natural environment within the city. It contains environmental significance and biodiversity values.

“The land’s acquisition and ongoing management protects its environmental values now and for future generations.”