HEALTHY EATING: Moses Guet, Karson Tiley and Alek Mayen from Staines Memorial College are pleased about the donations for the school's Breakfast Club.
HEALTHY EATING: Moses Guet, Karson Tiley and Alek Mayen from Staines Memorial College are pleased about the donations for the school's Breakfast Club. Cordell Richardson

How Ipswich kids access a healthy brekkie

BOXES of fresh produce, bread and cereals will be dropped off at one Ipswich school every week to help feed students who go to school on an empty stomach.

Access Community Services, along with its Harmony on Carmody Cafe, teamed up with Staines Memorial College to donate the food to their Breakfast Club program.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, one in seven schoolchildren are starting their day without eating.

Access chief executive officer Gail Kerr said breakfast was the most important meal of the day.

"It's vital for all children to have access to healthy foods in the morning for an optimal day of education and concentration," she said.

 

Staines Memorial College breakfast club. Agau Ajang, Emily Knight and Imogen Thomas.
Agau Ajang, Emily Knight and Imogen Thomas. Cordell Richardson

"For many families, the lack of funds can be attributed to children going without breakfast, and in partnership with Staines Memorial College and our community hub, which is on site at the school, it's important for us to look to support local families in giving the start they need for their children to grow and learn."

Access' community hub at the school is one of 12 community hubs across southeast Queensland.

Community hubs are places where migrant and refugee families, particularly mothers with young children, come to connect, share and learn.

It helps bridge the gap to help migrants feel more connected to their community and link them with community services.