HISTORY: David Oldfield has released a book about his time in politics, as a celebrity and his relationship with One Nation's Pauline Hanson.
HISTORY: David Oldfield has released a book about his time in politics, as a celebrity and his relationship with One Nation's Pauline Hanson. LAURA FRIEZER

Hanson's man recalls Ipswich protests at 1998 party launch

PAULINE Hanson's right-hand man David Oldfield has lifted the lid on the life with the controversial politician and recalled the time they were escorted by police to the Ipswich Civic Centre.

Oldfield, a controversial figure in Australian society, has released a tell-all book about his decade in politics and subsequent life as a celebrity.

He is perhaps best known as the instrumental figure in establishing One Nation; formed in 1998 by Ms Hanson, then an Ipswich politician.

His book, Before You Judge Me: Being David, reveals time he spent as a staffer to then-Liberal backbencher Tony Abbott, the rise of One Nation and his experience with Ms Hanson, and life after politics.

The 61-year old has fond memories of his time in Ipswich when he and Ms Hanson formed One Nation.

Oldfield recalls being escorted by police to Ipswich Civic Centre for the launch of the party.

"We certainly had quite a bit of argy-bargy with a few people," he said.

"There was a substantial level of protest and a substantial police presence."

Oldfield said those protests in Ipswich were the first of many against Ms Hanson.

"There was plenty of time to let Pauline Hanson know your views," he said.

"Everyone crawled out from under a rock.

"I don't think it was at all representative of Ipswich or the people of Ipswich."

Oldfield said people were bussed in to protest against the formation of One Nation which was then making headlines for its stance on multiculturalism.

Despite the tension outside the civic centre was packed with party faithful; giving Oldfield fond memories of the city.

He decided to write the book 12 years after leaving politics to give Australians what he says is the full story of his life.

"This is an opportunity for people, by all means, to make judgements," he said.

"So long as they have more of an understanding and information on which to judge.

"It is just absolutely raw and how it all was."

Oldfield, who is not kind to Ms Hanson in the book, said it was more a "conversational autobiography".

"People will read in there things they would never have known about Pauline," he said.

Oldfield's book is available from retailers or online.