TREKKER UPDATE: Ipswich's Google Trekker Josh Kerr, also known as 'The Bear', this week ventured into the wilderness, visiting White Rock as part of his adventure across the region.
TREKKER UPDATE: Ipswich's Google Trekker Josh Kerr, also known as 'The Bear', this week ventured into the wilderness, visiting White Rock as part of his adventure across the region. the bear

Google Trekker keeping good time one week on

ONE week of lugging 18 kilograms on a trek across Ipswich would be enough to cripple most people - but not The Bear.

Five days have passed since Josh 'The Bear' Kerr started recording some of the city's most prominent locations as the region's Google Trekker.

Six of 40 locations have been mapped and will soon be available for residents to view online.

Despite hours of walking and the heavy cargo he is carrying, The Bear insists he is not feeling sore.

"Surprisingly not," he laughed.

"At the end of the day if you're walking a lot you wake up sore - but I'm getting protein powder and supplements.

"I've been a gym junkie for three years and hike all the time.

The Bear is on a mission from Google and the Ipswich City Council to trek the region's well-known locations.

In the first week he was stopped several times by curious walkers; some who knew what he was doing and others who were gobsmacked by the cameras on his back.

What does he think of the newfound fame?

"I'm loving it," he said.

The Bear said Springfield Lakes was the most enjoyable location he mapped last week.

"The amount of scenery you have there in a small compact location is quite surprising," he said.

Fresh from the weekend off, The Bear and his crew expect to continue making good time.

"We're a bit ahead of schedule at the moment," he said.

The four days scheduled to walk White Rock is expected to be an overestimation, with Josh expecting to finish mapping the site in one-and-a-half days.

It will take about 60 days of clear weather to finish the recording - which works by capturing 360-degree images every two-and-a-half seconds via 15 cameras, to create an immersive experience of landscapes for people to see and explore before they set off on their own adventure.

When he finishes trekking the region, Google's technical team will piece together the footage and upload it online.