Louis Vercher appeared via video in Ipswich Magistrates Court for public nuisance after threatening staff and members of the public at Ipswich Hospital.
Louis Vercher appeared via video in Ipswich Magistrates Court for public nuisance after threatening staff and members of the public at Ipswich Hospital.

‘F--king fight me’: Man threatens staff, public at hospital

A MAN threw a roadworks sign at a passing car after yelling and swearing at Ipswich Hospital staff and security.

Ipswich Magistrates Court heard Louis Harley Vercher, 27, had "lost the plot" when he was told to leave after asking for mental health help at the Ipswich Hospital.

Police prosecutor Senior Constable Narelle Lowe told the court police were called to the hospital at 12.16pm on Friday.

When police arrived, they saw a man - Vercher - being restrained by multiple hospital security guards.

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"The male was yelling 'let me the f--k up, I want to smash every one of you c--ts'... and when police asked if he was threatening police, the defendant replied 'yeah, c--t, f--k you'," Snr Cons Lowe said.

The court heard police spoke to hospital security and learned Vercher had become verbally abusive after leaving the emergency department.

"(Security) told him to leave the hospital... he faced up to hospital security saying 'f--king fight me, come on, fight me'," Snr Cons Lowe said.

"He became threatening towards members of the public, attempting to fight by raising his fists up in front of his face in a fighting stance, yelling at them."

She said Vercher picked up a roadworks sign and thrown it at a passing vehicle, narrowly missing it.

Snr Cons Lowe told Magistrate Jacqueline Payne that Vercher was wanted on 14 interstate warrants.

Appearing in court from the watch house via video Vercher pleaded guilty to one count of public nuisance.

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Vercher's lawyer told the court his client had been visiting the hospital for help regarding mental health issues.

Ms Payne convicted Vercher but did not punish him for the public nuisance.

She told him his offence was "particularly abhorrent" as it took place at a hospital.

"People are perhaps at their most vulnerable and members of the public are entitled to visit loved ones or be attended to themselves without being disturbed by someone in the process of 'losing it', to use your words," Ms Payne said.

"It's particularly abhorrent because of the impact the conduct you engaged in has on members of staff at the hospital - people employed to do their job and are probably working a 12-hour shift."

Read more news by Ebony Graveur.