TRADITIONAL: Aboriginal dancers at the Deebing Creek camp, which has been occupied for more than 160 days.
TRADITIONAL: Aboriginal dancers at the Deebing Creek camp, which has been occupied for more than 160 days. Cordell Richardson

Elders hope for recognition as survey of mission starts

ELDERS camping at Deebing Creek have pinned their hopes of reconciliation on a treaty announced by the State Government this week.

The state has developed a Tracks to Treaty initiative which it hopes will "reframe the relationship” with First Nations peoples.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the treaty would promote "self-determination, truth-telling, local decision making, and better life outcomes” for Aboriginal people.

"We believe that a path to treaty will benefit all Queenslanders and help promote reconciliation, foster a shared pride in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and help heal the wounds of the past,” she said.

Roberta Graham, who has camped at Deebing Creek for more than 160 days, hoped the treaty would provide proper recognition of First Nations Peoples.

"The treaty is the first thing for recognition and respect,” she said.

Deputy Premier and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Jackie Trad said, for the treaty to be successful, "actions must speak louder than words”.

A small gathering of people remain at Deebing Creek as Frasers Property looks to develop part of the sacred site.

Project director Scott Ullman said a meeting would be held with traditional owners next week to discuss a cultural survey of the area.

He said there was no plan to remove campers, but acknowledged work on the development needed to start.