GROWTH: An artist impression of the new Lions stadium at Springfield which the council says will provide economic benefits to surrounding regions.
GROWTH: An artist impression of the new Lions stadium at Springfield which the council says will provide economic benefits to surrounding regions. Contributed

Economic, jobs benefits will make or break new stadium

SECURING funding for Springfield Stadium will be reliant on the Ipswich City Council proving its economic and employment benefits to the greater region.

Estimated to cost more than $70 million, the stadium would be a base for the men's and women's Brisbane Lions' teams.

An application to the Regional Growth Fund will be lodged by the council for funding. The location of the stadium is in an area excluded from the grant fund, but the council can still apply if it demonstrates "benefits and employment outcomes which flow directly into an eligible area".

Most Ipswich suburbs, excluding Ripley, Walloon and Rosewood, are not in the eligible Regional Growth Fund area. Ipswich Mayor Andrew Antoniolli said there would be no problem detailing the benefits of the stadium.

"A sports facility such as that and being home to what will be the AFLW Brisbane Lions team means there'll be enormous regional spin off," he said.

Timing for construction of the Brisbane Lions' Springfield stadium and training centre is dependent on the Federal Government committing to the project in this year's budget.

The State Government will be required to chip in $15 million, with the Federal Government previously indicating they were happy to match any state funding.

Member for Jordan Charis Mullen said the State Government would fund their share of the project when the Federal Government stumped up the cash.

"The Queensland Government is keen to see the fed's financial commitment for the stadium, hopefully announced in the upcoming May budget," she said last week.