A bag found on a shelf held 10 grams of dry cannabis.
A bag found on a shelf held 10 grams of dry cannabis. Zach Hogg BUN170314MAJ2

Drug users claim marijuana possession is for 'pain relief'

SELF-MEDICATING for pain relief with cannabis was the reasoning given in two unrelated drug offending cases heard before Ipswich magistrates in the past week.

One case involved a wheelchair bound man - the result of severe injuries suffered in a crash - the second a man who faces terminal cancer.

Both legal cases had favourable outcomes for the offenders.

Manfred Fitzroy Scrivener, 29, from Rosewood, pleaded guilty to producing dangerous drugs between June 7 and July 30 at Rosewood; possession of anything used in a drug crime; and possession of dangerous drugs.

Police prosecutor Ricky Tsoi said police found him with a grow tent, LED lighting, three humidifiers and transformer plugs.

Scrivener fell under suspicion after Australian Border Force officers intercepted a package that held 60 cannabis seeds.

Mr Tsoi said a rear shed at his Rosewood property held 13 cannabis plants in a grow tent - the plants between two and four weeks old.

A clip-seal bag found on a shelf held 10 grams of dry cannabis.

Defence lawyer Patrick Quinn said Scrivener was 24 when he suffered the injuries in a motor vehicle accident that limits the use of his upper limbs.

He experiences ongoing pain and burning sensations that makes his life uncomfortable, and the monthly pharmaceutical cost was $400.

"He was not a user prior to the accident. It does assist greatly with pain and spasm issues that he has,” Mr Quinn said.

"It was the first time he attempted to grow and he was caught.”

Mr Quinn said Scrivener was investigating the future lawful use of medicinal cannabis and would have to be assessed for a referral program.

And there was no commercial aspect to his offending -"Simply a man growing cannabis for medicinal purposes where other medications have been out of financial reach,” Mr Quinn said.

He sought a bond with no conviction.

Scrivener was placed on a $500 good behaviour bond for six months. No conviction recorded.

In the unrelated second matter, 48-year-old Geoffrey Mark Horder was put on a good behaviour bond for drug related offences after the court heard he was dying.

Horder, an invalid pensioner from Dugandan, pleaded guilty to producing dangerous drugs between July 23 and August 24; possession of dangerous drugs; possession of anything used in a drug crime; and possession of utensils.

Prosecutor, Senior Constable Carl Spargo, said detectives searched Horder's home in August and found two grow tents with 11 mature cannabis plants growing under lights. A bong and cannabis seeds were also seized. He had 100 grams of cannabis.

Defence lawyer Kelsea Read said Horder suffered a medical condition, cancer of the blood, and its diagnosis was terminal.

Ms Read said the medication had side effects and this was the reason Horder used cannabis to help mitigate these.

He was put on a $1200 bond for 12 months - no conviction recorded.