Millions of dollars will be spent on new fencing on Fraser Island in a bid to reduce interactions between the native dingo population and visitors to the island.

Close to 7km of fencing will be installed around Orchid Beach, following two recent incidents involving dingoes in the township - including an attack on a two-year-old boy.

Environment Minister Meaghan Scanlon said while families heading to the island had remained vigilant while travelling near dingo habitat, there had been a number of incidents where people had been injured.

"Fencing will protect visitors, Orchid Beach locals and K'gari's native dingo population, who our rangers believe no longer show apprehension when approaching humans because they've either been deliberately fed or eaten food scraps," she said.

The new fencing, which will cost $2m, will be the latest addition to the fences protecting 24 campgrounds on K'gari, and townships such as Happy Valley and Eurong.

 

Environment Minister Meaghan Scanlon said there had been a number of incidents where people had been injured.
Environment Minister Meaghan Scanlon said there had been a number of incidents where people had been injured.

 

Local Hervey Bay MP Adrian Tantari said the fencing would ensure visitors can be "as safe as possible", while also protecting the dingo population from human interaction.

"It will also act as an important reminder for people to be mindful that they're visiting an area native to dingoes, and to be dingo-safe every time they visit," he said.

The Environment Department will now engage with the Butchulla People's representatives on the design and alignment of the fence, which will include entry gates for vehicles and pedestrians.

"K'gari is world-famous for its beaches, flora, fauna and longstanding Aboriginal culture and connection," Ms Scanlon said.

"It's the reason why thousands of Queenslanders flock to the island each year, who in turn support the local economy and environment.

"The Butchulla people have managed K'gari as its traditional owners for thousands of years, and we'll work with them to get this right."

On-the-spot fines of $2,135 can be given out to those who intentionally feed or disturb dingoes on the island.

Originally published as Dingo-proof fence plan to reduce Fraser attacks