The Crime and Corruption Commission has been undertaking an audit of Queensland Local Government's compliance with Section 48A of the Crime and Corruption Act.
The Crime and Corruption Commission has been undertaking an audit of Queensland Local Government's compliance with Section 48A of the Crime and Corruption Act. David Nielsen

Council agrees to new CEO complaint process after CCC audit

THE way Ipswich City Council deals with allegations of corruption made against its own chief executive officer has been overhauled.

The new policy, endorsed after an audit by the Crime and Corruption Commission, relates to how councils deal with a complaint that involves or may involve allegations of corruption by the organisation's chief executive officer.

Under the new policy, if a complaint may involve an allegation of corrupt conduct against the CEO of Ipswich City Council, the mayor will be responsible as the nominated person to notify the Crime and Corruption Commission of the complaint and follow the process.

The Crime and Corruption Commission has been undertaking an audit of Queensland Local Government's compliance with Section 48A of the Crime and Corruption Act.

In a report to councillors, it was found the council did not have a policy to deal with corruption made against the chief executive officer.

"The CCC have noted that Ipswich City Council, together with a large number of other local governments in the State, have not adopted such a policy, and have drawn council's attention to the need to achieve compliance in this respect," it said.

Acting Mayor Wayne Wendt said the policy was introduced to "improve the previous procedure that existed for corruption investigations".

"The previous procedure was a one-size fits all for any staff in the organisation and although adequate for the purpose did not differentiate the unique position involving the CEO in any allegations," he said.

"The new policy is consistent with the requirements of the Crime and Corruption Act and provides procedures specific to an investigation of allegations involving the CEO, requiring the mayor to adopt appropriate procedures to ensure diligent investigation."

Cr Wendt said the council was a more transparent place, with all 19 recommendations of the Governance Review fully implemented in eight months.

"Let's not underestimate the task. This was a series of major reforms fully endorsed by all councillors," he said.

"We now have a much higher degree of accountability between council officers and elected representatives."