An increased number of flying foxes in the one area has temporarily closed parts of Nerima Gardens. Pic: file photo
An increased number of flying foxes in the one area has temporarily closed parts of Nerima Gardens. Pic: file photo

Council addresses Nerima Gardens closure amid bat problem

A LARGE amount of bats congregating in the one area has forced parts of Nerima Gardens at Queens Park to temporarily close.

Ipswich City Council said on Monday it was not the animals themselves which posed a possible risk to public safety.

It was, however, the possibility of a tree branch collapsing on public pathways within the Gardens that prompted council action.

Temporary closures are in place for some pathways at the Nerima Gardens, Queens Park.
Temporary closures are in place for some pathways at the Nerima Gardens, Queens Park.

The closure comes mere weeks after Ipswich City Council confirmed a sick bat located at the Gardens had tested positive for Lyssavirus.

If contracted by a human the disease could prove fatal.

The discovery in early December has since led many to speculate online that the latest closure to take place was somehow related.

An Ipswich City Council spokesman this morning said that was not the case.

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Increased numbers of flying foxes congregating in the one area at Nerima Gardens.
Increased numbers of flying foxes congregating in the one area at Nerima Gardens.

He instead said the risk of falling branches had increased due to the number of bats located in the one tree.

A sign has since been erected at the area to inform visitors of the closure.

It stated affected pathways were temporarily shut until further notice.

“A risk assessment has determined that flying fox roosts may pose a risk to public safety, especially falling tree limbs.”

“Council will continue to monitor the flying fox population and will reopen the paths once the public safety risk has been minimised.”

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A sign at the site informs visitors of the temporary closures.
A sign at the site informs visitors of the temporary closures.

It comes after Nerima Gardens was closed for two days last week as council workers removed the annual Christmas Wonderland lights display.

The spokesman said the increase of bats to the one area could likely be attributed to the animals being disrupted during the light removal process.

The spokesman said it was not uncommon for pathways to be closed due to similar incidents.

It is unknown at this time when the pathway might re-open.

That would only happen when majority of the bats had relocated to another area, he said.