Concerns Grow Over Pandemic Related Plastic Pollution
Concerns Grow Over Pandemic Related Plastic Pollution

Could new refuse centre improve waste management woes?

A NEW recycling and refuse centre could soon be developed in Ipswich after a recent survey revealed many residents were in favour of the idea.

The proposed development was among four key strategies put forward to strengthen Ipswich City Council’s waste management and resource recovery.

Council unveiled its Resource Recovery Strategy this week as part of a 10-year road map, outlining four key pillars to be put into action in consultation with residents to reduce waste generation and landfill disposal, as well as maximise resource recovery opportunities in line with circular economy principles.

The latest plan comes in response to community feedback following council’s ‘Reducing Our Waste’ survey released in November last year.

Recycling and Refuse Centres currently operate at Riverview and Rosewood.
Recycling and Refuse Centres currently operate at Riverview and Rosewood.

Data revealed the majority of respondents – 60 per cent of the total 351 – wanted to travel within 10km radius from their home to a Recycling and Refuse Centre.

Respondents also expressed a desire for a proposed new centre to be cost effective with both minimal environmental impacts and odour issues.

Currently two centres at Riverview and Rosewood service the Ipswich area.

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Other pillars of the road map detailed a possible kerbside food and garden organics collection service, as well as improved commingled recycling services.

A new low-cost, on-demand kerbside collection for large items would also be established though further details for each strategy are yet to be laid.

It would reportedly replace the two-year free service which currently operates.

Ipswich Mayor Teresa Harding says the road map was shaped in response to community feedback.
Ipswich Mayor Teresa Harding says the road map was shaped in response to community feedback.

There was a slight margin – less than 3 per cent – between respondents who opposed the transition to an on-demand service compared to those in favour.

Mayor Teresa Harding said council was committed to listening to its community in order to improve its response on the services.

She said waste disposal issues had been long-running and well-documented.

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“(At) the same time, the evidence base is building for the economic and environmental benefits of the circular economy model.”

Cr Harding said the road map delivered solutions in line with ratepayers’ expectations.

“It is council’s priority to listen to the diverse voices in our community in moving our city towards a brighter future on waste and resource recovery.”

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Read more stories by Kaitlyn Smith here.