Brookwater resident Emee Botha with her greyhound, Schnuki.
Brookwater resident Emee Botha with her greyhound, Schnuki. Rob Williams

Call out for greyhound adoptions

WHILE they are no longer champions on the track, these gentle natured, placid pooches make perfect pets.

Ex-racing greyhounds are in oversupply and there is now a call-out for people to foster or adopt the dogs with rescue agencies unable to keep up with demand.

Brookwater resident Emee Botha adopted her greyhound Schnuki two years ago and said despite not initially wanting a greyhound, she was happy with her decision.

"We had just lost our pet dog of about 14 years and were thinking of different options and thought we would do the responsible thing and adopt," Ms Botha said.

"I did a bit of research about the Friends of the Hound organisation and liked the way they created a community for those who had adopted.

"I would have never considered getting a greyhound but it was during that time that there was a high level of awareness around greyhound racing, so I knew there was a great need for homes.

"It was a really good decision as Schnuki has a wonderful personality, as all greyhounds have, and she is a really good companion dog."

Friends of the Hound foster carer, Karin Schuett said the organisation was in a state of crisis and were desperate to find people who could either foster or adopt one of the hounds.

"We are part of a core group of foster carers who get the dogs once they come out of the kennels, so we look after them, assess their temperament, get their vet checks and work out their personality and what kind of home they would suit," Ms Schuett said.

 

Brookwater resident Emee Botha with her greyhound, Schnuki.
Brookwater resident Emee Botha with her greyhound, Schnuki. Rob Williams

"It can be very draining to receive all these dogs who come to you in a poor state of health and in some cases people have 10-12 dogs at a time because they can't say no.

"We usually get a call from a trainer to say they've got some dogs they need to get rid of and you know that if you don't take them, they're dead.

"We've currently got 80 dogs in foster care and 80 more dogs waiting to come into the program and while some trainers are reasonable, there are many others that just treat the dogs like a product."

 

Goodna Greyhound trainer Keiron Butler has 14 puppies from one of his star bitches Eleazar (pictured).
Goodna Greyhound trainer Keiron Butler. David Nielsen

Goodna greyhound trainer, Kieron Butler said while he agreed the dogs were a beautiful breed, he denied the idea that the dogs were mistreated by the industry.

"Friends of the Hound wouldn't even know how we train," Mr Butler said.

"We've been with the Greyhound Adoption Program for the last five years or more and dogs from birth to death are tagged with a chip, so if you put down a dog without reason you're fined and will loose your licence," he said.

 

Goodna Greyhound trainer Keiron Butler has 14 puppies from one of his star bitches Eleazar.
Goodna Greyhound trainer Keiron Butler. David Nielsen

"I love my dogs and have three or four greyhounds as pets and look after them better than I look after myself which is what most trainers do.

"I'm a Justice of the Peace and if anyone is doing anything wrong they should feel the full force of the law."

If you are interested in adopting or fostering a dog, visit the Friends of the Hound website.