Clare May and Jeremy Newman had their wedding in Toowoomba postponed due to the Federal Government's strict new rules on gatherings due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Clare May and Jeremy Newman had their wedding in Toowoomba postponed due to the Federal Government's strict new rules on gatherings due to the coronavirus pandemic.

‘A wedding doesn’t compare to people dying alone’

A BRIDE is choosing to focus on the bigger issues in the world despite having her upcoming dream wedding postponed due to the global coronavirus pandemic, saying it doesn't compare when people are dying.

Clare May was looking forward to saying "I Do" with her fiancee Jeremy Newman and their children at the Gabbinbare Homestead in Toowoomba on August 12.

But due to strict new rules imposed by the Federal Government, which means weddings must now be limited to five people to curve the spread of the virus, the couple had no other choice but to push the date back.

"I have my wedding dress, it's currently hanging in my wardrobe," Ms May said.

"The kids are really devastated, because it was the joining of our two families. I have two kids and so does Jeremy.

"My mum, sister and bridesmaids are all British, and since half our guests are coming from the UK, we had to postpone anyway.

"My mum, sister and her kids are all in isolation over there, and we don't know what the world is going to look like in a few months or a year."

 

Clare May and her fiancée Jeremy Newman had their wedding postponed due to the coronavirus. The kids are sad, as the wedding was to join their two families together.
Clare May and her fiancée Jeremy Newman had their wedding postponed due to the coronavirus. The kids are sad, as the wedding was to join their two families together.

 

Ms May, a real estate agent in Springfield, and Mr Newman have been together for roughly two years, getting engaged 18 months ago.

"I had some pretty horrible things happen in my life three-and-a-half years ago," she said.

"I truly believed I would never date anyone again, but now I am so lucky to spend the rest of my life with Jeremy."

Ms May said many of her suppliers had been "really helpful" in booking in new dates, with the wedding now to go ahead in a year-and-a-half.

Despite all the uncertainty in the world due to the virus quickly spreading, Ms May said a "wedding doesn't compare to people dying alone".

"While a wedding is nice, it's not that important thing, especially when there are people out there dying without anybody holding their hand," she said, tearfully.

"The fact that I have had my wedding postponed is not as important as me being alive, the kids being alive, Jeremy being alive.

"I know we will get married one day."

She also expressed concern for many who could potentially lose their jobs.

"We were in the process of booking our makeup artists and hairdressers, and I just feel so sorry for them. This is their livelihoods," Ms May said.

"My other concern is many of these venues might go bankrupt."